Southeastern Technical College

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Vidalia Campus
Library: Room 143, Administration Building
Computer Lab: Room 803, Gillis Building
912-538-3132


Swainsboro Campus
Room 8133, Building 8
478-289-2322

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Leah Dasher
Director of Library Services
Vidalia Campus
Swainsboro Campus
(912) 538-3186
ldasher@southeasterntech.edu

Kaye Wickstrom
Assistant Librarian
Swainsboro Campus
(478) 289-2322
kwickstrom@southeasterntech.edu

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Radiologic Technology Degree

Offered at the Following Campus

Program Overview

The Radiologic Technology associate degree program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for positions in radiology departments and related businesses and industries. The program emphasizes a combination of didactic and clinical instruction necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive a Radiologic Technology Associate of Applied Science degree, and have the qualifications of an entry-level radiographer, and completed the Radiography Didactic and Clinical Competency Requirements of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) licensing exam.

The standard curriculum for the Radiologic Technology program is designed for the semester system. The degree occupational courses require 80 credit hours to complete and can generally be completed in 4 semesters. Students may enter the program fall semester. Please note that general core, general science core and four occupational courses (ALHS 1090, ALMA 1000, RADT 1010, and RADT 1065) are completed in the Health Care Sciences - Radiologic Technology Option Certificate.  Successful completion of ALMA 1000 with a “C” or better is required within three consecutive semesters (1 year) immediately prior to the students’ specific program admission. 

Entrance Requirements

  • Submit a completed application;
  • Be at least 18 years of age;
  • Submit official high school/high school equivalent transcripts;
  • Submit official college transcripts, if applicable;
  • Complete the components listed in the Health Care Science Certificate - Radiologic Technology curriculum with an overall 3.0 GPA; these courses (34 credit hours) must be completed with a minimum grade of "C" in each course and a cumulative GPA of 3.0. BIOL and ALHS course must have been completed within 5 years.
  • Please note that general core, general science core and four occupational courses (ALHS 1090, ALMA 1000, RADT 1010, and RADT 1065) are required for admission into the Radiologic Technology Degree program.   
  • Click here for more information about the Radiologic Technology Program.
  • Satisfy Placement Testing requirements.

Radiologic Technology Competitive Admission Process

Admission to the Radiologic Technology program is a competitive selection process based primarily on the grade point average of the Health Care Science certificate. Prospective students may gain admission to the college initially as Health Care Science certificate in order to complete any learning support classes, required general core courses and general core science courses. The Radiography program admits students once per year at the beginning of Fall Semester. Radiologic Technology Program seats are awarded from the highest grade point average downward until the maximum enrollment of approximately twelve (12) students is reached. In the event a class does not meet capacity, students possessing a GPA as low as 2.75 will be considered.

*Note: The number of students accepted into the Radiologic Technology program is based on the standards set by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT), which are based on the availability of the program's clinical education settings.

Special Note: A grade of "C" or higher is required in any course in Radiologic Technology in order to remain in the program.

Readmission to the Radiologic Technology Program

Students dropped from any Radiologic Technology program for attendance (i.e., health related, family illness, and personal hardship), academic reasons or students who have made less than a "C" in a Radiologic Technology course will be allowed to repeat a course(s) one time only. Also, a student may repeat only one semester within the Radiologic Technology curriculum in which the minimum grade of "C" was not earned. This policy applies to transfer students the same as for students fully in residence.

Readmission to the program will be granted on a competitive and space-available basis, whereas all criteria apply as described in the section "Admission of Radiologic Technology Students". Students will be required to pass both a comprehensive and a clinical skills competency exam with a minimum score of 80% on each exam to be eligible to compete for readmission. Students granted readmission to the Radiologic Technology program in order to repeat a course(s) must be readmitted to the program within 12 months from the date of their last completed semester.

*For more detailed program information, please refer to the Catalog & Handbook.

Course Overview

Contact Minutes
Credit Hours
Curriculum Outline (80 hours)
General Core Curriculum (18 hours)

(Prerequisite: None) This course is designed to provide tools to assist students to acquire skills necessary to achieve academic and professional success in their chosen occupational/technical program of study. Topics include: Computer Applications/Technology Skills, Getting off to a Good Start, Learning and Personality Styles, Time and Money Management, Study and Test Taking Skills, Stress Management and Wellness, Communication Skills, and Career Exploration.

3
2250
(Prerequisite: Appropriate English Placement Test Score AND Appropriate Reading Placement Test Score) Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.
3
2250
(Prerequisite: ENGL 1101) Emphasizes American literature as a reflection of culture and ideas. A survey of important works in American literature. Includes a variety of literary genres: short stories, poetry, drama, nonfiction, and novels. Topics include literature and culture, essential themes and ideas, literature and history, and research skills.
MATH
1111
3
2250

(Prerequisites: Appropriate algebra placement test score) Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.

3
2250

(Prerequisite: Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores) Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on critical thinking and fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychological disorders and treatment, stress and health, and social psychology.

SPCH
1101
3
2250

(Prerequisites: ENGL 1101- Institutional Requirement) Introduces the student to the fundamentals of oral communication. L Topics include selection and organization of materials, preparation and delivery of individual and group presentations, analysis of ideas presented by others, and professionalism.

General Core Science Courses (8 hours)
3
2250
(Prerequisite: Regular Admission) (Co-Requisites: BIOL 2113L, ENGL 1101) Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.
1
2250
(Prerequisite: Regular Admission) (Co-Requisites: BIOL 2113, ENGL 1101) Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2113. The laboratory exercises for this course include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous sensory systems.
3
2250
(Prerequisite: BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L) (Co-Requisites: BIOL 2114L) Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.
1
2250
(Prerequisite: BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L) (Co-Requisites: BIOL 2114) Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2114. The laboratory exercises for this course include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.
Occupational Courses (54 hours)
(Prerequisite: Provisional Admission) Introduces the elements of medical terminology. Emphasis is placed on building familiarity with medical words through knowledge of roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Topics include: origins (roots, prefixes, and suffixes), word building, abbreviations and symbols, and terminology related to the human anatomy.

 

(Prerequisites:  MATH 1012) (Co-requisites:  MATH 1111)  Prepares students in understanding the application of mathematics in their health science program courses.  The topics included are basic mathematics, medical terminology, mathematical conversions, weight and measurement applications used in health science programs. Additionally, problem solving strategies, basic principles of medication administration, and research in health science will be incorporated into the course competencies.

 

4
3750
(Prerequisite: Program Admission) (Co-requisites: RADT 1030, RADT 1320 ) Introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices, and issues common to many specializations in the health care profession. In addition to the essential skills, students explore various delivery systems and related issues. Provides the student with an overview of radiography and patient care. Students will be oriented to the radiographic profession as a whole. Emphasis will be placed on patient care with consideration of both physical and psychological conditions. Introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices, and issues common to many specializations in the health care profession. In addition to the essential skills, students explore various delivery systems and related issues. Topics include: ethics, medical and legal considerations, Right to Know Law, professionalism, basic principles of radiation protection, basic principles of exposure, equipment introduction, health care delivery systems, hospital and departmental organization, hospital and technical college affiliation, medical emergencies, pharmacology/contrast agents, media, OR and mobile procedures patient preparation, death and dying, body mechanics/transportation, basic life support/CPR, and patient care in radiologic sciences.
3
3750

(Prerequisites: Prerequisites for degree students are Program Admission, BIOL 2114, and BIOL 2114L. RADT 1010 must be taken as either a pre-requisite or co-requisites) (Co-requisites: RADT 1010)Introduces the knowledge required to perform radiologic procedures applicable to the human anatomy. Emphasis will be placed on the production of quality radiographs, and laboratory experience will demonstrate the application of theoretical principles and concepts. Topics include: introduction to radiographic procedures; positioning terminology; positioning considerations; procedures, anatomy, and topographical anatomy related to chest and abdomen cavities, bony thorax, upper extremities, shoulder girdle; and lower extremities.

 

3
3750

(Prerequisites: RADT 1010, RADT 1030)(Co-requisites: RADT 1330)
Continues to develop the knowledge required to perform radiographic procedures. Topics include: anatomy and routine projections of the pelvic girdle; anatomy and routine projections of the spine, gastrointestinal (GI) procedures; genitourinary (GU) procedures; biliary system procedures.

2
1500

(Prerequisites:  Program Admission; Program Instructor Approval) Content of this course is designed to establish a basic knowledge of atomic structure and terminology. Other topics include the nature and characteristics of x-radiation; ionizing and non-ionizing radiation; x-ray production; the properties of x-rays and the fundamentals of x-ray photon interaction with matter.

4
3750

(Prerequisites:  Program Admission; Program Instructor Approval) The content of this course introduces factors that govern and influence the production of the radiographic image using analog and digital radiographic equipment found in diagnostic radiology. Emphasis will be placed on knowledge and techniques required to produce high quality diagnostic radiographic images. Topics include:  Image quality (radiographic density; radiographic contrast; recorded detail; distortion; grids; image receptors and holders (analog and digital); processing considerations (analog and digital); image acquisition (analog, digital, and PACS); image analysis; image artifacts (analog and digital); Guidelines for selecting exposure factors and evaluating images within a digital system will assist students to bridge between film-based and digital imaging systems. Factors that impact image acquisition, display, archiving and retrieval are discussed. Laboratory experiences will demonstrate applications of theoretical principals and concepts.

2
3000

(Prerequisites: RADT 1060)(Co-requisites: RADT 1330, RADT 2340) Continues to develop the knowledge required to perform radiographic procedures. Topics include: anatomy and routine projections of the cranium; anatomy and routine projections of the facial bones; anatomy and routine projections of the sinuses; special radiographic procedures, pathological considerations of the cranium, facial bones, sinuses and special procedures.

3
3000

(Prerequisites:  Program admission; Program Instructor Approval) Content establishes a knowledge base in radiographic, fluoroscopic and mobile equipment requirements and design. The content also provides a basic knowledge of Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) devices, beam restriction, filtration, quality control, and quality management principles of analog and digital systems. Laboratory experiences will demonstrate applications of theoretical principles and concepts. 

(Prerequisites: Program Admission) Provides instruction on the principles of cell radiation interaction. Radiation effects on cells and factors affecting cell response are presented. Acute and chronic effects of radiation are discussed. Topics include: radiation detection and measurement; patient protection; personnel protection; absorbed dose equivalencies; agencies and regulations; introduction to radiation biology; cell anatomy, radiation/cell interaction; and effects of radiation.

3
2250
(Prerequisite: RADT 1160, RADT 1200, RADT 2090, RADT 2350) (Co-requisites: RADT 2360) Provides a review of basic knowledge from previous courses and helps the student prepare for national certification examinations for radiographers. Topics include: image production and evaluation; radiographic procedures; anatomy, physiology, pathology, and terminology; equipment operation and quality control; radiation protection; and patient care and education.
4
9000
(Prerequisite: RADT 1030) (Co-requisites: RADT 1030) Introduces students to the hospital clinical setting and provides an opportunity for students to participate in or observe radiographic procedures. Topics include: orientation to hospital areas and procedures; orientation to mobile/surgery; orientation to radiography and fluoroscopy; participation in and/or observation of procedures related to body cavities, the shoulder girdle, and upper extremities. Activities of students are under direct supervision.
7
15750
(Prerequisite: RADT 1010, RADT 1030, RADT 1320) (Co-requisites: RADT 1060) Continues introductory student learning experiences in the hospital setting. Topics include: equipment utilization; exposure techniques; attend to and/or observation of routine projections of the lower extremities, pelvic girdle, and spine; attend to and/or observation of procedures related to the gastrointestinal (GI), genitourinary (GU), and biliary systems; and attend to and/or observation of procedure related to minor radiologic procedures. Execution of radiographic procedures will be conducted under direct and indirect supervision.
6
13500
(Prerequisite: RADT 1330) Provides students with continued hospital setting work experience. Students continue to develop proficiency in executing procedures introduced in Radiographic Procedures. Topics include: patient care; behavioral and social competencies; performance and/or observation of minor special procedures, special equipment use, and participation in and/or observation of cranial and facial radiography. Execution of radiographic procedures will be conducted under direct and indirect supervision.
9
20250

(Prerequisites: RADT 2340)(Co-requisites: RADT 2260) Provides students with continued hospital setting work experience. Students demonstrate increased proficiency levels in skills introduced in all of the radiographic procedures courses and practiced in previous clinical radiography courses. Topics include: patient care; behavioral and social competency; advanced radiographic anatomy; equipment utilization; exposure techniques; sterile techniques; integration of procedures and/or observation of angiographic, interventional, minor special procedures; integration of procedures and/or observation of special equipment use; integration of procedures and/or observation of routine and special radiographic procedures; and final completion of all required clinical competencies. Execution of radiographic procedures will be conducted under direct and indirect supervision.