Southeastern Technical College

Southeastern Technical College
Apply Online Pay Online

Vidalia Campus
Library: Room 143, Administration Building, 912-538-3132
Monday & Tuesday: 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Wednesday & Thursday: 7:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Computer Lab: Room 803, Gillis Building
Monday - Thursday: 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Swainsboro Campus
Room 2301, Instructional Building
Monday - Thursday: 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
478-289-2322

All campus libraries are closed between semesters.

Text Us @ 912-388-0343

For more information:

Jane Summey
Director of Library Services
Swainsboro Campus: Monday, Tuesday
Vidalia Campus: Wednesday, Thursday
(912) 538-3209
jsummey@southeasterntech.edu

Leah Dasher
Librarian
Vidalia Campus
(912) 538-3186
ldasher@southeasterntech.edu

Melany Bowen
Assistant Librarian, Evening
Vidalia Campus
(912)538-3132
mbowen@southeasterntech.edu

Cassandra Hall
Assistant Librarian, Day
Swainsboro Campus
(478) 289-2322
chall@southeasterntech.edu

Kaye Wickstrom
Assistant Librarian, Evening
Swainsboro Campus
(478) 289-2322
kwickstrom@southeasterntech.edu

Close

Public Services

Public Services

Close
Hero Image

Associate of Science in Nursing

Offered at the Following Campus

Program Overview

The Associate of Science in Nursing program is designed to produce technically-advanced, competent, and caring individuals who are prepared to practice professional nursing in a variety of healthcare settings. The curriculum will provide the student with the necessary attitude, knowledge, and skills to practice competently and safely as a beginning nurse generalist in acute, long-term, and community healthcare settings.

The ASN Program consists of humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences courses as preparation for the nursing program. The curriculum combines general education and nursing education courses to provide the student with a foundation for scientific knowledge, interpersonal skills, cultural competence, critical thinking training, and ethical nursing care.   Upon entrance into the program, students receive didactic and clinical components to meet requirements for successful completion of the Program.  Clinical experiences are selected to provide the student with a broad range of learning opportunities. Graduates will receive an Associate of Science Degree in Nursing. Program graduates, who meet and fulfill exit requirements, will be eligible to apply to the Georgia Board of Nursing to take the National Council Licensing Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN).

*The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) approved the Associate of Science in Nursing degree program on January 10, 2014 and includes the ASN in the scope of the current accreditation for Southeastern Technical College.

*The Georgia Board of Nursing (GBON) granted initial Program approval in July 2013 with final Program approval pending graduation and licensing of first ASN class.

After completion of all core classes, including the completion of PSYC 2103 and BIOL 2117/2117L, students will begin the Nursing courses. These classes consist of 41 credit hours and will span over four semesters. Fundamental nursing concepts and skills will be taught before moving into more advanced classes. The Program will end with a nursing capstone clinical course and leadership skill training. One class will be accepted into the ASN program each year, beginning Summer semester.

Entrance Requirements

  • Prospective students seeking admission into the Associate of Science in Nursing Program will enroll in the Health Care Science Certificate - Associate of Science in Nursing option initially.
  • Submit a completed application & application fee;
  • Be at least 18 years of age;
  • Submit official high school transcript or GED transcript;
  • Submit official college transcripts, if applicable;
  • Satisfy Placement Testing requirements.
  • All Health Care Science (HCS) classes must be successfully completed with a grade of “C” or better.
  • The student’s grade point average (GPA) will be calculated based on the grade earned in all HCS courses required for the nursing curriculum; this will include transfer and repeated classes.
  • The higher a student’s GPA, the higher the students will rank in the competitive portion of the admission process.
  • BIOL 2113/2113L, BIOL 2114/2114L, BIOL 2117/2117L must be completed within the last five years.
  • Scoring on the Test of Essential Academic Skills – V (TEAS) is utilized in the nursing entry process. An adjusted individual total score of 66% or greater on the TEAS will be needed to be considered for admission into the ASN Program.
  • One class will be accepted into the ASN program each year, beginning Summer semester.
  • Deadline for submission of all admission documents is May 4, 2015, in order to be considered for acceptance into the Summer semester 2015. 
  • Click here for more information.

Course Overview

Contact Minutes
Credit Hours
General Core Curriculum (73 hours)

 

(Prerequisites:  MATH 1012) (Co-requisites:  MATH 1111)  Prepares students in understanding the application of mathematics in their health science program courses.  The topics included are basic mathematics, medical terminology, mathematical conversions, weight and measurement applications used in health science programs. Additionally, problem solving strategies, basic principles of medication administration, and research in health science will be incorporated into the course competencies.

 

(Prerequisite: None) This course is designed to provide tools to assist students to acquire skills necessary to achieve academic and professional success in their chosen occupational/technical program of study. Topics include:  Getting off to a Good Start, Learning and Personality Styles, Time and Money Management, Study and Test Taking Skills, Stress Management and Wellness, Communication Skills, and Career Exploration.

3
2250
(Prerequisite: Appropriate English Placement Test Score AND Appropriate Reading Placement Test Score) Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.
3
2250
(Prerequisite: ENGL 1101) Emphasizes American literature as a reflection of culture and ideas. A survey of important works in American literature. Includes a variety of literary genres: short stories, poetry, drama, nonfiction, and novels. Topics include literature and culture, essential themes and ideas, literature and history, and research skills.
3
2250
(Prerequisite: Regular Admission) (Co-Requisites: BIOL 2113L, ENGL 1101) Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.
1
2250
(Prerequisite: Regular Admission) (Co-Requisites: BIOL 2113, ENGL 1101) Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2113. The laboratory exercises for this course include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous sensory systems.
3
2250
(Prerequisite: BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L) (Co-Requisites: BIOL 2114L) Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.
1
2250
(Prerequisite: BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L) (Co-Requisites: BIOL 2114) Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2114. The laboratory exercises for this course include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.
3
2250

(Prerequisite: Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores) Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on critical thinking and fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychological disorders and treatment, stress and health, and social psychology.

XXX
xxx
General Education Elective
3
0
Choose One: (3 hours)
3
2250

(Prerequisites:  Appropriate algebra placement test score)  Emphasizes functions using real-world applications as models.  Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra; functions and graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and models; systems of equations; and optional topics in algebra.

MATH
1111
3
2250

(Prerequisites: Appropriate algebra placement test score) Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.

General Education Courses taken after admission into the ASN Program (7 hours)
3
2250
(Prerequisite: BIOL 2113 and BIOL 2113L OR BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1111L) (Co-Requisites: BIOL 2117L) Provides students with a foundation in basic microbiology with emphasis on infectious disease. Topics include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, microorganisms and human disease.
1
2250
(Prerequisite: BIOL 2113 and BIOL 2113L OR BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1111L) (Co-Requisites: BIOL 2117) Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2117. The laboratory exercises for this course include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, and microorganisms and human disease.
PSYC
2103
3
2250

(Pre-requisites:  PSYC 1101) Emphasizes changes that occur during the human life cycle beginning with conception and continuing through late adulthood and death and emphasizes the scientific basis of our knowledge of human growth and development and the interactive forces of nature and nurture. Topics include but are not limited to theoretical perspectives and research methods, prenatal development and child birth, stages of development from infancy through late adulthood, and death and dying.

Occupational Curriculum (41 hours)
7
9000

(Pre-requisite:  Program Admission, BIOL 2117/2117L, PSYC 2130) (Co-requisite:  RNSG 1010) This course introduces the student to the client, the role of the professional nurse, and the healthcare delivery system.  The course prepares the student for subsequent nursing courses. Theoretical and historical content foundational to nursing practice is also introduced. The nursing process is taught as the framework to organize and deliver nursing care. Throughout the course, opportunities are provided to develop competencies necessary to meet the needs of individuals throughout the lifespan with an emphasis placed on developing critical thinking, caring, and fundamental nursing skills. Clinical and nursing skill opportunities are provided in the nursing laboratory and acute care settings. Clinical practice-based learning activities and interactions will be offered to allow professional development through praxis, reflection, critical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, accountability, provision and coordination of care, advocacy, and collaboration.  

(Pre-requisite:  Program Admission, BIOL 2117/2117L, PSYC 2130) (Co-requisite:  RNSG 1000) This course introduces the student to basic principles of pharmacology and the basic mathematical concepts utilized in calculating medication dosages for safe administration to patients throughout the lifespan. The concepts of legal implications, pharmacokinetics, calculation of drug dosages, and medication preparation will be areas of focus. The student is also introduced to the role of the nurse in assessment, planning intervention, and evaluation of the patient receiving pharmacologic therapy. 

7
8250

(Pre-requisite:  Program Admission, RNSG 1000, RNSG 1010) (Co-requisite:  RNSG 1030)This course reinforces theory and fundamental nursing skills and introduces the student to the concepts of adult health nursing. The nursing process is used as a framework to organize content and deliver nursing care. Students use critical thinking as the basis for decision regarding planning, intervention and evaluation when caring for clients with medical- surgical disorders. Pharmacological principles are integrated throughout the course. Simulated laboratory and clinical settings provide an opportunity to develop competency in nursing skills and caring in nursing practice. Clinical opportunities are provided in a variety of medical- surgical settings. Clinical practice-based learning activities and interactions will be offered to allow professional development through praxis, reflection, critical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, accountability, provision and coordination of care, advocacy, and collaboration.  

6
7500

(Pre-requisite:  Program Admission, RNSG 1000, RNSG 1010) (Co-requisite:  RNSG 1020) This course focuses on the childbearing women, families, and the care of infants and children. Focus is placement on the nursing process, critical thinking, and caring in relation to concepts of child and family development from conception through adolescence, and common, recurring pediatric illnesses. Pharmacological principles are integrated in the course. The laboratory experiences focus on the assessment of the pregnant women, the newborn and application of growth and development principles. Clinical opportunities are provided in the community and acute care settings. Clinical practice-based learning activities and interactions will be offered to allow professional development through praxis, reflection, critical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, accountability, provision and coordination of care, advocacy, and collaboration.  

4
4500

(Pre-requisite:  Program Admission, RNSG 1000, RNSG 1010, RNSG 1020, RNSG 1030) (Co-requisite:  RNSG 2010) This course in medical-surgical nursing continues to build on previous medical- surgical content and is expanded to include higher level clinical decision-making, patient teaching, and coordination of care in the healthcare environment. Pharmacological principles are integrated throughout the course. Campus laboratory experiences allow the student to practice more complex psychomotor skills. Clinical experiences in the acute care facilities provide the students the opportunity to implement a more sophisticated knowledge base and skill level. Clinical practice-based learning activities and interactions will be offered to allow professional development through praxis, reflection, critical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, accountability, provision and coordination of care, advocacy, and collaboration.  

3
3750

(Pre-requisite: RNSG 1000, RNSG 1010, RNSG 1020, RNSG 1030) (Co-requisite:  RNSG 2000)This course focuses on application of the nursing process to meet the needs of patients/ clients experiencing psychiatric or maladaptive behaviors. Emphasis is on integration of therapeutic communication and mental health assessment in the healthcare environment. Pharmacological principles are integrated.  Clinical opportunities are provided in in-patient and outpatient mental health, long-term care, outpatient rehabilitation, as well as but not limited to home health, hospice, and public health settings. Clinical practice-based learning activities and interactions will be offered to allow professional development through praxis, reflection, critical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, accountability, provision and coordination of care, advocacy, and collaboration.  

(Pre-requisite: Program Admission, RNSG 1000, RNSG 1010, RNSG 1020, RNSG 1030, RNSG 2000, RNSG 2010) (Co-requisite:  RNSG 2030) This course builds on the didactic and clinical experiences learned in previous adult health courses, and introduces the student to the concepts of advanced medical-surgical disorders in the adult. In order to facilitate transition into the role of a professional nurse, the student will have the opportunity to develop independence in caring for groups of patients under the direction of faculty and a preceptor.  In both simulated and clinical laboratory settings, the student applies the nursing process by demonstrating competency, caring, critical thinking, and decision-making skills for clients with complex illnesses.  Pharmacological principles are taught as they relate to the illness. Clinical opportunities are provided in a variety of settings and preceptor experiences. Program exit competency exam will be taken. Clinical practice-based learning activities and interactions will be offered to allow professional development through praxis, reflection, critical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, accountability, provision and coordination of care, advocacy, and collaboration.  

(Pre-requisite: Program Admission, RNSG 1000, RNSG 1010, RNSG 1020, RNSG 1030, RNSG 2000, RNSG 2010) (Co-requisite: RNSG 2020)This is a non-clinical course that will assist students in developing a broader perspective in nursing by exploring current professional nursing issues.  The focus is on current trends and issues, work ethics, systems, and mechanisms of case management, effective delegation, nursing informatics, and competencies required for licensure as a professional nurse.